Home  Subscribe  Advertising  Community  About Us Archives

740-472-0734 < P.O. Box 70, Woodsfield, OH  43793  < monroecountybeacon@sbcglobal.net

Below are links to portions of this week's news articles. For the full story, pick up a paper at your local newsstand or send $1.25 with your name/address to P.O. Box 70, Woodsfield, OH  43793.

 
June 18, 2009



Woodsfield Mayor Bill Bolon administers the oath of office to Mike Cox, who replaces the late Paul Byers on Woodsfield Village Council. 

Woodsfield names new council member
by Arlean Selvy
Publisher
A new council member was named at the June 1 meeting of Woodsfield Village Council, which also named the bid for waterline installation from Rubel Lake to the village.

Mike Cox was elected to fill the council vacancy created due to the death of Paul Byers. Cox was sworn in by Mayor Bill Bolon during the council session and immediately assumed his position. 

Village Administrator Jeff Woodell reported that three of the four bids received for waterline installation were disqualified for various reasons. He said the low bidder did not meet the criteria and scope of the project, another company did not bid the entire project and a third came in after the 2 p.m. deadline.

The bid was awarded to Gary Rubel Excavating of Lewisville with a bid of $447,644 
Ferguson Water Works, Marietta,  will provide pipe at a cost of $104,741.17 and valves and hydrants at $16,776.09. The company was one of five bidding for the materials.

According to Woodell, the waterline will stretch from the back of Rubel’s Lake to the village’s water treatment plant. He said 36,000 feet of pipe will be used for the gravity-fed system which will follow Sunfish Creek to the treatment plant.

The village purchased the 20 acre lake in February of 2008 at a cost of $448,000.
The village has been under order of the Ohio EPA to increase its water supply for several years. Currently there is only 132 day supply and the  EPA mandates a 270 day supply. With acquisition of the lake, Woodsfield will have a supply for over 500 days.

“There will be no need to ask residents to conserve or businesses like the car washes and laundromats to shut down,” said Woodell. “This project is a huge advantage not only to Woodsfield in the present, but to the future of Woodsfield and the businesses to come.”

The waterline project will be paid for with CDBG and ARC grants. The local match of $56,000 will be in the form of a zero percent loan from the Ohio Water Development Authority.

The third reading of an ordinance to adopt demand meter rates was passed on a 6-0 vote. The ordinance deals with electric service provided for commercial and industrial customers that cause the village to reach peak usage.

In other matters, Woodell reported the swimming pool at Monroe Memorial Park opened June 5.

Councilman Bill Moore reported a complaint about the yellow line on West Marietta Street ending where the road splits at Moose Ridge. He asked that the line be “extended down  over the hill so that traffic doesn’t cross it.”
No action was taken.

Councilman Dale English reported a complaint about a line fence on Eastern Ave. Discussion was held about the  reviewing of a village ordinance.

With regard to a possible mosquito problem at the post office, Woodell said he spoke with the postmaster and the postal department plans to take care of the potential problem.
Council entered into executive session for personnel with regard to hiring, potential litigation and confidentiality. 

Sheriff to Add SUV to Fleet
by Arlean Selvy
Publisher
At the request of Sheriff Charles Black Jr., his office will purchase a 4-wheel drive SUV and obtain quotes for fire extinguishers.
Sheriff Black approached Monroe County Commissioners during their June 1 meeting and asked about the items. 
Black was given permission to purchase a 2000 Cadillac Escalade through the state purchasing surplus program. The cost is $4,325. Black noted the monies will come from law enforcement funds (forfeitures). The Escalade will replace the department’s Explorer, which has been taken out of service.
The sheriff explained at least one fire extinguisher in the jail is outdated and no longer has pressure. He indicated a representative from Dynamic Safety Resources, Woodsfield, checked the extinguisher. In addition, he was informed that the basic fire extinguisher located in the main radio room will do more damage than a halitron extinguisher, which would smother the fire. 
In addition, Black explained there are no extinguishers in the department’s 10 cruisers. He noted the cruisers are outfitted with new radios and in-car cameras. “It would be quite costly to lose a cruiser,” he told officials.
Commission President John Pyles recommended that Black obtain three quotes for the extinguishers and services.
Beth Rose, clerk of courts,  told commissioners she is applying for a $10,000 USDA Community Facilities Grant. She asked for the required resolution to be attached to the grant and signatures on the grant application. 
The grant will allow the Clerk of Courts office to replace its server, which is shared with the Common Pleas Court and the County Court. At a prior session, Rose had explained to officials the need to update the system.
Officials renewed the contract of Raymond Bauer as prevailing wage coordinator.

Civil War Encampment
June 13, 14
The sound of cannons will echo around the hills of the Monroe County Fairgrounds on June 13 & 14 as the 91st Ohio Volunteer Infantry Company B reenactment unit hosts the 4th annual Woodsfield Civil War Encampment.
Reenactors will come from the surrounding states to bring life to this fascinating time in America’s history. Event organizer and reenactor, Kyle Yoho, says this year will have many new activities occurring.  One of the highlights on Saturday will be the Civil War Memorial Ceremony where a Union Company will be marching to the Courthouse where speakers will commemorate the sacrifices of Monroe County’s soldiers and the ladies will place a wreath on the Civil War Memorial.
Throughout the weekend, education is blended with fun for young and old, with the ultimate goal to help spectators become aware and thankful for the sacrifices made during the Civil War for us to live in a free country today. The continued support of many dedicated local businesses make this FREE weekend designed for families to come and spend the whole weekend to watch the program unfold.
Talk with the soldiers of both Blue and Gray. Come and learn about how the 1860’s woman dressed at 10:30 a.m. and attend Ladies Tea at 11 a.m. Take a step into the life of the common soldier on both sides of the Mason & Dixon line and explore their uniforms and equipment at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday and watch the demonstrations of the artillery and weapons. See how a surgeon coped with the aftermath of a battle with a medical demonstration presented by Major Douglas Gill. Feel as though you are in the Civil War and attend the battles at 2 p.m. each day. Hear and learn about the “Songs of the Civil War” throughout the day brought to you by Bob Welch.
  Take a step back in time at the Monroe County Fair-grounds and relive history! Come to Woodsfield June 13-14 for the Woodsfield Civil War Encampment.
The Monroe County Fairgrounds is located on SR 26 in Woodsfield. The event and parking are free. Bunting Concessions will be set up. Mark the family calendar to see history come alive June 13, 9 a.m. - 10:30 p.m., and June 14, 9 a.m.- 4 p.m.
 

Members of the Monroe County Chamber of Commerce welcomed the new owners of Malaga Greenhouse, located on SR800, north of Woodsfield. Stan and Joan Roby have purchased the business from Dan and Sue Greenlee. Shown, from left, are Ruth Workman, Melissa Smithberger, Dan and Sue Greenlee, Joan Roby; back: Kiven Smithberger, Jason Gallagher, Ron Gallagher, Tom Scott and Stan Roby.          

Photo by Martha Ackerman
by Martha Ackerman
Staff Writer

“It was time to get self-employed,” said Stan and Joan Roby, new owners of Malaga Greenhouse, formerly owned by Dan and Sue Greenlee. 

“We’ve always enjoyed landscaping around our house and I think this will be easy to adapt to,” added Joan. 

“We wanted something new,” said Stan.
The business will remain known as Malaga Greenhouse. “Our goal is to make the transition as seamless as possible for customers,” added Joan.
Stan grew up in the Beallsville area. He worked with computers for a corporation. The couple, who recently lived in Fairfield, Ohio, always enjoyed visiting in the summer. “I’m so excited,” said Joan, who grew up as an ‘Army brat.’ “I’ve lived in asphalt and concrete all my life. The country here is so beautiful. It’s fantastic that I am now living here.”

Dan and Sue Greenlee purchased the greenhouse in 1973. They will be staying on for the next year working one-on-one with the couple. As the seasons change, something is always different in the business. Dan and Sue will be lending their expertise to make an easy transition for the couple.

“We have a lot to learn,” said Joan.

Dan keeps a journal which tells him which plants to start when. That will be a great help to the new owners.

The couple is not planning to change anything except to expand the strawberry business. About nine years ago, Dan began importing unrooted strawberry tips from Canada. The plants are relatively disease free. The strawberry plants have become a big economic boost for the greenhouse and the couple plans to expand the market.

Currently, the plants are shipped to Missouri, Wisconsin and other states. They are marketed locally at Jebbia’s Market in Wheeling.

Malaga Greenhouse is located on SR800 north of Woods-field. The phone number is the same–740-472-1116. Hours are Monday thru Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

It’s a Male Bonding Weekend
by Martha Ackerman
Staff Writer


The roads, the hospitality, the people. That’s what has brought these motorcycle enthusiasts to Monroe County each May for 20-plus years. Twenty-eight riders made the trek this year. They found great accommodations at the Olive Tree Inn and the Victorian Rose.
Photo by M. Ackerman

“It’s a male bonding weekend,” laughed Carl Bergman, one of 28 motorcycle enthusiasts who enjoy a Monroe County weekend annually. For 20 years or more, some of the riders have been coming to the rolling hills of Monroe County the last weekend of May.
The riders came from Detroit, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Indiana and even Florida. The trip began from “The Place Off the Square,” a Longaberger-owned hotel in Newark. 
Each year they stay at the Olive Tree Inn, formerly the Pioneer Motel, and at the Victorian Rose.
Bergman noted that the late Betty Hines, who ran the Pioneer Motel, had been very good to them over the years. “We even sent flowers to her funeral,” he said.
They love the roads. People treat them very well and the lady who lives next door to the motel fixes them a dinner each year. The law enforcement is considerate of them, he added.
Bergman said that in motorcycle lingo, the twisty, turny roads are called “crankin and bankin’ - all within the speed limit, he chuckled.
Bergman is retired from the Ford Motor Company. His daughter is a former producer of the Jerry Springer Show. His son Steve, a civil engineer for HDR engineering, is also a member of the group. Bergman’s brother was a former American Motorcycle Association “Rider of the Year.”
For many years Paul “Shooky” Reagan has joined the group in Woodsfield. Reagan met the group when they stopped in his establishment during one of their Monroe County visits. He had admired one of the bikes so the owner handed him the keys, told him to take it for a ride and drop it off the at motel where the group was staying. They’ve been friends ever since. “We always make a stop at Kiedaish Point,” said Reagan. 
The men come from all walks of life. Bruce Coudill is a Kent Lincoln Mercury Mazda dealer. 
Jimmy Stewart is vice-chairman of Marketing Associates. Chuck Beuke works in bulk mail advertising. “I send you all that junk mail,” he laughed. “I come here because it’s the best riding and Shooky lives here. It’s inexpensive entertainment.”
Larry Parcell is a Cincinnati banker. “I’m the person no one likes right now,” he quipped.
Randy Hott is a construction company surveyor from To-ledo. “I like the roads, the people are hospitable and we have a wonderful time,” said Hott.
Lou Wetzel is a flooring contractor from Cincinnati. “It’s excellent riding and the roads are very well taken care of,” he said.
Rodney Gray has been riding for 40 years. He owns a towing service. Dicky Ayres is an electrician. “I come because the country is beautiful and I like to make fun of Rodney,” he laughed.
Randy Gray owns Brat Screen Printing/Embroidery Promotional Products company in Cincinnati.. Larry Stafford is retired from Ford Motor Credit.
Bruce Shawver owns a manufacturing company in Cincinnati. The company makes specialized filtration systems for pharmaceutical companies and nuclear power plants. He lives on the Ohio River in a houseboat.
Two new members this year are James Metzger, who owns an Ace Hardware store in Louisville, Ohio, and Jeff Kragey, who owns a small engine shop. Bergman met them in Europe when they rode in the Ultimate Alps Motorcycle Tour encompassing five countries: Germany, Austria, Italy, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.
  The roads, the hospitality, the people! That’s what brings this group of motorcycle riders back to Monroe County each year.


D.J. Duke Wins Second Division III Championship




River Senior D.J. Duke gets set to put the shot during Friday’s Division III state track and field meet in Columbus. Duke put the shot 68 ft.-8.25 inches to claim the state title.

River High School’s D.J. Duke went to Columbus June 5 seeking another gold medal in the Division III shot put. He also went into his final high school meet with his eye on a state record, a state meet record and in doing so he wanted to surpass the 70-foot plateau.
“I came as close as I possibly could,” said the Ashland-bound Duke.
Duke won his second consecutive Division III state shot put championship at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium, Columbus, with a put of 68-ft-8.25 inches. In the process, he broke his own state record and also broke the state-meet record, which had stood since 1991.
Duke, who also competed in the discus but failed to reach the finals, threw a state-championship toss of more than  61-feet on his first throw of the competition and went on to fight for the 70-ft. mark.
He fell short, but not by much. Duke wrapped up his second straight state championship and achieved three of his four goals: a gold medal, state record and state-meet record. With regard to the 70-ft  toss he’d set as a goal, he said, “I came in with a goal and I gave it my best shot,” said Duke. Sixty-eight feet isn’t too bad at all, but it’s not the big 7-0, but I’ll still take it.”
Duke broke his state record on his third throw of the competition, 67-ft-8 and a quarter. No other competitor broke the 60-ft mark.
After the finalists were announced and warmed up, Duke, the last thrower in the finals, fouled on his first attempt before unleashing his mammoth toss to seal the deal.
From the top of the podium in center field he was amazed at the cheers when his winning mark was announced.
“Those cheers sent shivers down my spine,” he said. “I was getting cold chills because it felt so great. It’s an amazing feeling that never gets old.”
Duke’s celebrity status at local track meets has been  on-going. 
As the marks and distances added  up, the crowds continued to flock to the shot-put circle to watch the two-time first-team all-Ohio football player do what he loves the most.
“I’m definitely going to miss [the crowds] next year,” said Duke. “It’s going to feel weird not throwing in high school anymore. I’m definitely going to miss all of my friends.”
Duke will be an immediate challenger at Ashland, which is the home of the Division II National Shot Put Champion. Competi-tion won’t be hard to find.
“There’s going to be competition on my own let alone everywhere else next year,” said Duke.
A true student of the shot put, Duke has put in the necessary work to achieve his status as the area’s all-time best shot putter and one of the state’s best ever to go along with the natural ability, which saw him break the coveted 50-ft. mark as a mere freshman.
“I put a lot of time into this and it paid off for me,” Duke said. 
Despite throwing further than 50-feet each of his first two seasons, Duke never placed in the state meet until he busted out a 60-foot throw in the 2008 state finals. Those two trips to Columbus served as pure motivation.
“I learned a lot my freshman and sophomore years,” said Duke. “I wish I had done better obviously, but it prepared me and taught me what things I needed to do differently and those paid off.”
Coach Tim Frye has been with Duke all the way - through the ups and through the downs.
“Coach Frye has been like a  second father to me,” said Duke. “I’ve spent five years with him now. He gave up his time during the winter months to come train with me after school and took me to every meet this year whether it was indoors or outdoors. I just don’t know where I’d be now if it weren’t for Coach Frye.”
Duke currently owns three state championships. He won the indoor title in March. 
Obituaries

REV. NOAH J. OXLEY, JR.
Rev. Noah John Oxley, Jr., 73, Sheffield Lake, formerly of Woodsfield and Amherst, was called home June 9, 2009, at Cleveland Clinic surrounded by his family. He was born Sept. 24, 1935 in Dillonvale, where he was raised. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree after attending Wash-ington Bible School, Ohio University, Gannon College in Pennsylvania and finally the School of Divinity in Evans-ton, Ill.  He has served the Lord in Coshocton, Chand-lersville, Conneaut, Bristolville, Amherst and Woodsfield, all in Ohio. After his retirement, he made his home in Lorain and Woodsfield residing in Sheffield Lake for the last two years.

Noah served in the United States Marine Corp. during the Korean Conflict. He retired after 33 years in the ministry from Amherst Old Stone United Methodist Church in 1998. After his retirement, he carried out a part-time call at the Clarksfield United Metho-dist Church. His hobbies in-cluded fishing and hunting and watching professional sports, especially baseball and football.

Surviving are his loving wife of 49 years, Betty Fern Oxley, (nee: Hill); three sons Noah John Oxley, III, and Mark Oxley, both of Woods-field, Nathan (Cindy) Oxley of Sheffield Lake; two daughters, Angela Baron of Huron, Teresa Stull of Ludowici, Georgia; 13 grandchildren; sister, Mary-anne Oddo of Akron; and a half-sister, Karen Butler of Rayland.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Noah John, Sr. and Anna Martin Oxley (nee Proger); brother, Benjamin Eugene Oxley; and a half-sister, Eva.

Friends were received June 11 at Hempel Funeral Home, Amherst and visitation continued at Watters Funeral Home, Woodsfield, June 12. Funeral services were held June 13 at Woodsfield First United Methodist Church, with Rev. Robert Mitchell officiating. Burial was in Oaklawn Cemetery, Woodsfield.

Memorial contributions may be made to Amherst Old Stone United Methodist Church, 553 South Main St., Amherst, OH 44001; or the Woodsfield United Methodist Church, 136 North Main St., Woodsfield, OH 43793, or the National Parkinson Foundation, 1501 NW 9th St., Bob Hope Rd., Miami, FL 33136.

JANETTE H. DECKER

Janette Hariett Decker, 95, Beallsville, passed away peacefully on June 4, 2009, at Woodsfield Nursing and Rehab Center. She was born Jan. 24, 1914 near Beallsville, a daughter of the late Henry and Nora Jean McDougal Smith.

She was a member of the Beallsville Church of Christ, the Barnesville Hospital Twig, and the New Castle Home-makers Club. She was owner and operator of the former Decker’s Market in Beallsville for 40 years.

Surviving are a daughter, Cora (Jim) Yocco of Caldwell; two sons, Vernon (Sandra) Decker of Hannibal, Joseph (Vivian) Decker of Beallsville; and four granddaughters, Stacy (Steve) Gallaher and their children, Megan and Jacob of Ashville, Andrea (David) Blake and son, William of Hannibal, Adreanna (Erik) Winland of Cambridge, and Jo-Ellyn Decker of Washington, D.C.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband of over 50 years, Mansel Decker; and a sister, May Edgar.

Friends were received June 6 at Harper Funeral Home, Beallsville, where funeral services were held June 7. Burial followed in Beallsville Cemetery.

Online condolences may be offered at www.harperfh.net

Rev. Noah John Oxley, Jr., 73, Sheffield Lake, formerly of Woodsfield and Amherst, was called home June 9, 2009, at Cleveland Clinic surrounded by his family. He was born Sept. 24, 1935 in Dillonvale, where he was raised. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree after attending Washington Bible School, Ohio University, Gannon College in Pennsylvania and finally the School of Divinity in Evans-ton, Ill.  He has served the Lord in Coshocton, Chand-lersville, Conneaut, Bristolville, Amherst and Woodsfield, all in Ohio. After his retirement, he made his home in Lorain and Woodsfield residing in Sheffield Lake for the last two years.

Noah served in the United States Marine Corp. during the Korean Conflict. He retired after 33 years in the ministry from Amherst Old Stone United Methodist Church in 1998. After his retirement, he carried out a part-time call at the Clarksfield United Metho-dist Church. His hobbies in-cluded fishing and hunting and watching professional sports, especially baseball and football.

Surviving are his loving wife of 49 years, Betty Fern Oxley, (nee: Hill); three sons Noah John Oxley, III, and Mark Oxley, both of Woods-field, Nathan (Cindy) Oxley of Sheffield Lake; two daughters, Angela Baron of Huron, Teresa Stull of Ludowici, Georgia; 13 grandchildren; sister, Mary-anne Oddo of Akron; and a half-sister, Karen Butler of Rayland.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Noah John, Sr. and Anna Martin Oxley (nee Proger); brother, Benjamin Eugene Oxley; and a half-sister, Eva.

Friends were received June 11 at Hempel Funeral Home, Amherst and visitation continued at Watters Funeral Home, Woodsfield, June 12. Funeral services were held June 13 at Woodsfield First United Methodist Church, with Rev. Robert Mitchell officiating. Burial was in Oaklawn Cemetery, Woodsfield.

Memorial contributions may be made to Amherst Old Stone United Methodist Church, 553 South Main St., Amherst, OH 44001; or the Woodsfield United Methodist Church, 136 North Main St., Woodsfield, OH 43793, or the National Parkinson Foundation, 1501 NW 9th St., Bob Hope Rd., Miami, FL 33136.

HARRY E. KNOWLTON

Harry E. Knowlton, 84, of Graysville, died June 15, 2009, at the Woodsfield Nursing and Rehab Center. He was born in Monroe County July 16, 1924, a son of the late Lawrence Ray Knowlton and Mary Louise Smith Knowlton.

He retired from Washington Electric and worked as a right-of-way foreman. He was a veteran of World War II, where he received the Purple Heart.

He is survived by two sons: Larry Knowlton and Bill (Bonnie) Knowlton, all of Graysville; two daughters: Linda (Heber) Piatt and Cheryl (Rick) Shook, both of Graysville; two sisters-in-law: Eileen Knowlton and Imogene Piatt, both of Graysville; five grandchildren: Scott (Teresa) Piatt, Kathy (Jeff) Brown, Mike (Ashley) Piatt, Keith (Danetta) Knowlton, Missy Knowlton and her fiance Walter Dean; seven great-grandchildren: Trevor and Macy Brown, Lexi, Kylie and Carter Piatt; Hunter and Emily Knowlton; and Cole Dilts.

He was preceded in death by his wife Maxine Knowlton in May, 2009; and one son, Roger Knowlton.

Friends will be received June 17 from 2-8 p.m. at the Bauer-Turner Funeral Home, Woodsfield, where services will be held June 18 at 1 p.m. with Ministers George Hoskins and Anthony McSwords officiating. Interment in the Low Gap Church Cemetery near Graysville. Military services conducted by the Belmont Veterans Council.

EVELYN MAE ARMANN BROOKS

Evelyn Mae Armann Brooks, 92, of Beallsville, died June 15, 2009, in Barnesville Hospital. She was born Nov. 27, 1916, a daughter of the late Everett Armann and Vida Wheeler Armann.

Surviving are three daughters, Donna (Tom) Hyland, Centreville, Va.; Joyce (David) Simmons, Jackson; and Terri (Audie) Bednarczyk, Powhat-an Point; six grandchildren: Stephen (Jennifer) Hyland, Fairfax, Va.; Timothy (Jan) Hyland, Leesburg, Va.; Lori (Matt) Simmons Stalter, Schererville, Ind.; Merry Beth (Allen) Hyland Hall, Mont-pelier, Va.; Amanda (Mike) Simmons Aring, Los Angeles, Calif.; and Scott Riley, McMechen, W. Va.; and four great-grandchildren: Matthew and Katy Stalter, Schererville, Ind.; Brett Hyland, Leesburg, Va.; and Emma Aring, Los Angeles, Calif.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband George Brooks; three brothers: Oscar Wheeler, Roy Armann and John Armann; four sisters: Lodema Brooks, Margaret Brooks, Lois Loomis and Jean Galavich; and two grandchildren: Guy David Simmons and Melissa Leigh Riley.

Family and friends will be received on Wednesday, June 17, from 2 to 8 p.m. at Toothman Funeral Home, Jacobsburg, where services will be held June 18 at 11 a.m. with Rev. Marian Glass officiating. Burial in Powhatan Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to Amity United Methodist Church, Barnesville Hospital Foundation or the charity of the donor’s choice.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Low Gap Cemetery fund, c/o Janet Graham, 36075 Harmon Ridge Rd., Graysville, OH 45734.

Condolences can be expressed online at:www.bauerturner.com 

PEARL E. BECKETT

Pearl E. Beckett, 83, of Sardis, died June 12, 2009 at the New Martinsville Health Care Center, New Martins-ville, W.Va. She was born May 11, 1926, in Sistersville, W.Va., a daughter of the late Dewey and Lissie Billiter Henderson.

She was a member of the Woodsfield Christian Church and a volunteer at Barnesville Hospital for over 30 years. She loved quilting and gardening.

She is survived by one son, Steven Beckett of Sardis.

Preceding her in death in 1988 was her husband Clifford Beckett.

Friends were received at Bauer-Turner Funeral Home June 14 where services were held June 15 with Minister Hubert Alexander officiating. Interment in the West Union Cemetery near Sardis.

Condolences can be expressed on line at: www.bauerturner.com

Around the Burnside
Confidence comes from not always being right, but not fearing to be wrong.
It is usually easier to do what is right than to explain why you did wrong.

Well, in case you are wondering, and I doubt if you are, the unofficial, official rainfall in Lewisville for the month of May was 5.1 inches. I also estimate the grass and weeds in our lawn grew over a foot in May, although this is difficult to measure exactly.

Have you ever noticed or seen something happening you wish you would have thought of or done? This one goes way back for me.

We had rather a large lawn at home. Like every lawn it required mowing every so often. We did not have the machinery we have today. Now I can sit on my rusty dusty and have our lawn mowed in a tink over an hour. All I have to do is turn off my hearing aids and ride on my merry way. The hearing aids are due to the lack of wearing ear protection in the school shop or around machinery, but this is another story.

We had two mowers; you know the kind with a reel that went round and round and cut the grass against a blade that was maybe sixteen inches long. Believe me our lawn was several 16 inches big.

One of our mowers was a heavy built job and did a good job. The other one was lighter built but did not do as good a job.

OK, you know which one I had to use. Then to top this, someone in our family got the bright idea of catching the clippings and putting them in the chicken yard. So a grass catcher was hooked on to the heavier mower.

You then had to push a little faster in order for the clippings to make it into the basket. When the grass catcher got full, which didn’t take very long, you had to take it off the mower, carry it to the chicken yard, dump it, fasten it back on the mower and start pushing again. It didn’t bother me at all when we had one of those chickens for Sunday dinner.

All of this was brought to mind while we were riding somewhere. I noticed a couple of young people mowing with a reel type mower. One was pushing the mower and the other had a rope tied to the front and was pulling.

The second I saw this being done I thought, “Why didn’t I think of doing that?” I knew I had a couple of friends I could have suckered into doing this. I think I could have thought of doing something in order to get them to pull the mower. Maybe even getting them to think they were a horse pulling team at the county fair. If I could have done that I would have it made. Too late when you think of something like this.

Another thing that has bothered me for years I saw yesterday and some time ago. An adult on a riding mower along with a small youngster riding along. I do not care; I think this is a very stupid thing to do.

Something could happen that would not be forgotten for the rest of a person’s life. I have no idea why anyone would do something like this. 

I’ve always thought that anything that moves with a rider can be trouble if not handled correctly. If it does not have a second seat it should never have the second rider on it. There is no reason for the second rider. It’s an accident just asking to happen.

While I’m in this mood. During the Hunter Education class I conduct, if I say it once I say it a hundred times, “Always keep the muzzle of your gun pointed in a safe direction.” I don’t think your foot is a safe direction, as happened the other day.

I guess maybe we have too many ways to have an accident nowadays. I suppose I was kind of lucky; our machinery was operated by manpower or four-legged horse power. Our old mules were rather tame except sometimes tough to catch. We had to watch old Tony as he was a race horse in his younger days. Our cows didn’t cause much trouble that a boot would not cure, unless you were wearing gum boots. I will say I did chuck a walnut or a small stone at a cow once in a while. On the other hand they got a good swat at me with their tail at times, when I was milking. Nothing very exciting just work. I guess the most dangerous thing I did around town was play follow the leader on my bicycle with friends.

I almost forgot. We never had to worry about the electricity going off when we milked our cows. We had no milking machine.

I guess you saw the front page of the Beacon last week. A couple of pictures and the story about the Mini Relay for Life held in Beallsville, number one in the state. There are a lot of folks and students need a pat on the back. It is an accomplishment that can happen only when everyone pitches in to help. The money raised is very important; however, everyone working together is perhaps more important.

I suspect the junior class will have a bit of doing to hold on to their first place in their cardboard cars. And a blond basketball coach? Thanks for your excellent job. Wouldn’t it be great if we could have all the areas in our county come together for a big activity some time?
I do not take credit for this but something big on July 8 will happen. OK the 4th is a big day but here is what happens at exactly five minutes and six seconds after four o’clock on the 8th.
04:05:06  07/08/09 Now you know.

Remember: The devil doesn’t care how much good you do, as long as you don’t do it today.
Church on Sunday? Good.