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740-472-0734 P.O. Box 70, Woodsfield, OH  43793   monroecountybeacon@sbcglobal.net

Below are links to portions of this week's news articles. For the full story, pick up a paper at your local newsstand or send $2 ($2.50 if the issue is over 3 months old) with date of paper requested, your name and address to P.O. Box 70, Woodsfield, OH  43793 and we will send you a paper.

 
May 6, 2010

Voters Decide Candidates, Issues  

Ohio voters went to the polls Tuesday, May 4 to decide who will be on the ballot in November, along with two state issues. Local candidates were: for County Commissioner, full term commencing 1/1/11: Democrat incumbent John V. Pyles, receiving 1,132 votes; Republican James R. Williams, 553 votes. Both will be on the November ballot. For Monroe County Auditor: Democrat incumbent Pandora J. Neuhart, who was unopposed, received 1,267 votes. For County Coroner, unexpired term ending 1/7/2013: No candidates filed.

In the state contests, Monroe County voter results:  for the gubernatorial seatDemocratic incumbent Governor Ted Strickland with Yvette McGee Brown, Lieutenant Governor, received 1,360 votes. Republicans challenging the seats were John Kasich for Governor and Mary Taylor, Lieutenant Governor, garnered 603 votes. In opposition for the Attorney General seat were Democrat Richard Cordray, 1,207 and Republican Mike DeWine 532. 

For Auditor of State: Democrat David Pepper, 1,117, and Republicans Seth A. Morgan, 174 and David A. Yost 398. For Secretary of State: Democrat Maryellen O’Shaughnessy, 1,117, and Republicans: Jon Husted, 350, and Sandra O’Brien, 235. For Treasurer of State: Democrat Kevin L. Boyce, 1,144, and Republican Josh Mandel, 502. For United States Senator: Democrats Jennifer Brunner, 1,005, and Lee Fisher, 497; Republican Rob Portman, 531.

For Representative to Congress (6th District): Democratic incumbent Charlie Wilson, 1,120, Jim Renner, 442; Republicans  Donald Allen, 133, Bill Johnson, 280, and Richard D. Stobbs 160.

For Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, full term commencing 1/1/11: Democrat Eric Brown, 1,120; Republican Maureen O’Connor, 510. For Justice of the Supreme Court, full term commencing 1/1/11: Democrat Mary Jane Trapp, 1,100, and Republican Judith Ann Lanzinger, 471. For Justice of the Supreme Court, full term commencing 1/2/11: Republican Paul E. Pfeifer, 483, with no Democratic opposition. 

For Judge of Court of Appeals (7th District), full term commencing 2/9/11: Democrat Gene Donofrio, 1,087, with no Republican opposition. For Member of State Central Committee, Man (20th District): Democrats Darrell Lear, 155, William E. Moore, 1,151, and Anthony Vernell, 185; Republicans Pete Couladis, 72, Patrick Hennessey, 330, and Bruce E. Kelbaugh, 111. For Member of State Central Committee, Woman (20th District): Democrats Susan Mitchell, 702, Jacqueline J. Rothschuh, 200, and Judy Wray, 289; Republicans Marilyn K. Ashcraft, 375, and Rebecca J. Khune, 151. 

For State Representative (93rd District): Democrats Frank D. Fleischer, 392, and Linda Secrest, 1,109; Republican: Andy Thompson, 506. For the Judge of the Court of Common Pleas, full term commencing 1/1/11: no declaration of candidacy filed. Two state issues were on the ballot. Issue 1: Proposed constitutional amendment to extend the Ohio Third Frontier Program by authorizing the issuance of additional general obligation bonds to promote economic growth. For 1,179, Against 1,011. Issue 2: Proposed constitutional amendment to change the location of the Columbus casino facility authorized by previous statewide vote. For 1,169, Against 1,011. 

Wilson Village, tax levy: For 15, Against 4. Noble Local SD, bond issue and tax: For 7, Against, 18.

Mor For Less Local Liquor Option, Precinct 6: Yes 59, No 33.

Man Arrested, Awaiting Extradition 

Monroe County Sheriff Chuck Black reports that 51 year-old Joseph Cutright was arrested on Thursday, April 29. Cutright’s initial contact with Monroe County deputies was on April 25. Cutright was found walking along SR800 just north of Woodsfield. Deputies tried to obtain positive identification. Since no photo identification was obtainable, deputies allowed Cutright to return to his State Route 800 residence. Further investigation into the identity of Cutright was conducted a short time later. It was determined that Cutright was wanted out of Harrison County, West Virginia for sexual abuse.

When deputies returned to the residence to make the arrest, Cutright was not there. Officers from Woodsfield Police Department were notified of the finding and of the suspect’s physical description. Cutright was observed in the Village of Woodsfield a few hours later. When approached by officers, Cutright ran to avoid apprehension. A search of the area was conducted by the Woodsfield Police Department with Sheriff’s Deputies assisting. Woodsfield Police Chief Chuck Hamilton made the request to notify Woodsfield residents of the description through the Village’s telecom system. The search was suspended a few hours later with no success in apprehending Cutright.

The Sheriff reports receiving several calls over the next several days from residents reported to have seen the suspect. Deputies responded to all of these calls and were unable to locate Cutright. The sheriff’s office received a call on April 29 reporting a man matching Cutright’s description was running through a field on SR 78 east of Cameron. Deputies responded and were able to arrest Cutright without incident. 

Cutright appeared before Judge James Peters on April 30 for an extradition hearing. Cutright waived extradition and is awaiting pickup by West Virginia authorities. He is currently being housed in the Noble County Jail.

Sheriff Black states that there was no criminal activity committed by Cutright while he was in Monroe County. This activity was based solely on the arrest warrant from the State of West Virginia. Many rumors were circulated regarding rapes and murders during this incident. Black assures that there were, in fact, no rapes or murders.

 

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GMN Tri-County Community Action Committee (GMN) and Belmont Technical College (BTC) have partnered to expand access to higher education to residents in and around Monroe County as part of the county’s overall Higher Education Plan enacted by BTC in 2009 and approved by Monroe County Commissioners. Shown, from left, are Gary Ricer, GMN CEO, and Joseph Bukowski, BTC President.             Photo Submitted

Access to Higher Education Expanded in Monroe County 

GMN Tri-County Community Action Committee (GMN) and Belmont Technical College (BTC) announced recently that the two have partnered in a joint venture that will expand access to higher education for residents in and around Monroe County as part of the county’s overall Higher Education Plan enacted by BTC last year and approved by the Monroe County Commissioners.

“Through the agreement, officially signed recently by GMN CEO Gary Ricer and BTC President Joseph Bukowski, BTC will operate the GMN Broadband Center computer laboratory at the Black Walnut Center in Woodsfield to provide local and convenient access to highspeed internet service, online course materials and BTC programs for students and residents in Monroe County and surrounding areas.

“We are very pleased to officially kickoff this endeavor to provide greater access to education and career opportunities for students and residents,” Bukowski said. “Access to broadband internet service is a real challenge in rural communities, which poses a significant barrier to education. Through this center, we hope to eliminate some of those barriers by providing access to the technology and services needed for a modern higher education. I commend Monroe County officials for their proactive approach in supporting the strategic educational plan that has brought us to this exciting event today.”

Bukowski said the college intends to provide for the daytoday management of the computer lab in accordance with its plans to offer both onsite courses and online programs at the center. In addition, the lab will be available for students and residents to use for course work, research and other activities.

Last summer, BTC agreed to work with Monroe County Commissioners and lead the county’s higher education initiative. With enrollment growing for BTC programs in Monroe County, the college began working with local and state officials, including Gov. Ted Strickland, to build a strategic plan based on the guidelines put forth by the Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric Fingerhut’s 10year strategic plan for the university system of Ohio.

“I congratulate Belmont Technical College and Monroe County in working together to forge this partnership that so effectively reflects the board’s goal of making higher education more accessible and efficient through community partnerships,” Fingerhut said. “It’s part of our vision for Ohio that we create seamless, lowcost pathways to higher education that allow students to attain the education they need to compete in a global workforce and build a stronger economic foundation for the state of Ohio. I believe this program will help achieve those goals for Monroe County and the surrounding area.”

For its part, GMN will continue to provide the broadband at the center, as it has since the center first opened in September 2005.  Monroe County, the college began working with local and state officials, including Gov. Ted Strickland, to build a strategic plan based on the guidelines put forth by the Ohio Board of Regents Chancellor Eric Fingerhut’s 10year strategic plan for the university system of Ohio.

“I congratulate Belmont Technical College and Monroe County in working together to forge this partnership that so effectively reflects the board’s goal of making higher education more accessible and efficient through community partnerships,” Fingerhut said. “It’s part of our vision for Ohio that we create seamless, low-cost pathways to higher education that allow students to attain the education they need to compete in a global workforce and build a stronger economic foundation for the state of Ohio. I believe this program will help achieve those goals for Monroe County and the surrounding area.”

For its part, GMN will continue to provide the broadband at the center, as it has since the center first opened in Sept. 2005.

“Federal funds provided for the GMN Broadband Center and although various curriculums have been offered here over the years, our partnership today allows BTC to take this to the next level,” Ricer said. “We’ll provide high speed internet access to support BTC’s curriculum.

“GMN will retain office space in the Broadband Center to continue network support to our customers."

"We are very excited about the possibilities for this center and the potential for the expansion of higher education programs in our area,” said current county commissioner John Pyles. “The economy is evolving from one based almost entirely on industry to a more knowledge-based economy and we need to prepare our residents to compete in this environment. This partnership is a huge step in the right direction and I’m looking forward to the innovative programs that will come about down the road now that this is in place.”

Commissioner Pyles said the location of the Black Walnut Center, in the heart of the county’s Commerce Park, will provide easy access for people to attend classes, and show businesses they can use the facility for company training.

The partnership will begin on July 1. BTC anticipates offering classes at the Center during fall quarter, which begins September 2010.

For more information about BTC’s programs at the BTC Monroe County Center, visit www.btc.edu or call Tim Houston, Dean of Off Campus Operations at 740-6959500, Ext. 1158.

Presented Distinguished Service

Troy Hickman has been involved with Beallsville High School sports for the past 25 years, varsity football manager for 18 years and the Blue Devil Baseball Team, serving in different capacities. He was honored recently at the 2010 All Star Classic, held at Buckeye Trail High School, when he was presented the 20092010 Distinguished Service Award. Hickman was nominated for the award by Beallsville High School head girls’ basketball coach Terry Jarrett.

Troy has been a fixture with the Lady Devils Basketball program for the past 12 years,” said head girls’ basketball coach Terry Jarrett.  ”He attended practices and games always with a positive attitude willing to make our team better.  Troy would give inspirational speeches at different times throughout the year to motivate the players  to do their best.  He has been a true fan and positive role model for our athletes.  We wish him continued success and thank him for his support and commitment to Beallsville Blue Devils Athletics. Troy is the ultimate Blue Devil Fan.  There is none better.”

Troy became the manger of the Beallsville Blue Devil football team when he was in the 9th grade,” said BHS head football coach Dave Caldwell. “Troy has been an inspiration to the school, fans and community with all the heart and hustle he has shown over the past 25 years. There has not been a better Beallsville Sports fan than Troy Hickman.  He is true blue through and through.”

Troy holds a special place in the hearts of all Blue Devil fans, from his fiery speeches before a game, to his congratulatory remarks after the game. He always encourages those around him and practices good sportsmanship, as witnessed by Bridgeport Varsity girls’ Coach Ed Metz, “Troy always welcomes you to Beallsville and  congratulates you. What stands out in my mind is when he hugged me and congratulated me after the Class A OVAC game.”

“He is a very deserving recipient of this award. He embodies all of the qualities that are required to receive such a prestigious award. His desire to achieve and his dedication and loyalty to Beallsville sports make him Beallsville High School’s greatest fan,” said BHS athletic director Delmas Moore: “Troy has been a fixture at Beallsville High School sporting events for many years and is very popular and well liked by everyone. Troy loves all sports and is always interested in our teams and how they are doing. He is our super fan and I am very pleased that he is being honored. We congratulate Troy and hope that he stays with us for many years to come.”

Troy is the son of Terry and Seroba Hickman.

Around the Burnside  

The only difference between a rut and a grave is the length and depth.

Healthy is merely the slowest possible rate at which one can die.

For the first, well, maybe the second time, we sent our vote in early. This year we sent our vote in the next day after receiving our ballot. It’s so much trouble to walk across the street to vote. I didn’t realize voting early was so much fun.

I think most of us get any number of phone calls telling you the value of voting for something or why you should vote for a certain candidate. I just let them complete all their reasons and I say, “I’ve already voted.” I just thought,;it would be more fun if I added, “I didn’t vote for you either.”

I had several ladies tell me, “Lard really makes a flaky pie crust.” I know that. I just forgot to mention it. I also read of a restaurant in Barberton that deep fries chicken in lard. People flock there to eat their chicken. They claim to have the best fried chicken, even better than KFC.

I also forgot to mention something else. I remember we had at times what was called salt fish on our table. No, I didn’t eat any of the yucky fish, but others seemed to like them.

I guess salt was used to preserve a lot of things. Then the man tells me I should eat green beans without salt.

While I’m still in this thing about milk I came across something interesting in this month’s issue of Country Living. It seems the Snowville Creamery in Meigs County sells what you might call milk milk.

It goes back to how milk was produced 40 years ago. The method of pasteurization at the lower temperature and the results in the milk not being homogenized. Because of this the fat in the milk is not all mixed up so you can’t tell it’s fat, so the cream comes to the top of the milk. You have to stir it or shake it to mix in the cream (fat).

The herd of cattle that produce the milk feeds and is in the pasture field not as some of the larger producers do. The article didn’t say how things were handled in the winter but I’ll bet he feeds plenty of good hay.

This is no little operation as the milk comes from a herd of 350 head on a 400 acre farm. I think maybe one thing that helps the taste is they have a picture of a Jersey cow in the story. This is the kind of milk I grew up on, except, the only pasteurization our milk received was Mom straining it through a cloth after we carried it from the barn.

I understand those who try this milk never go back to the other milk because it tastes so much better than the milk available at your store. It does not get around here or WalMart so I can’t try it. Probably costs a bit more but not nearly as much as the so called organic milk you hear about.

Who was the first person to look at a cow and say, “I think I’ll squeeze these dankley things and drink whatever comes out?”

A field across the way has been plowed up getting ready to plant some type of crop. I can not remember it ever been plowed up since we moved here years ago. I am guessing they will plant corn.

Every time I see this happening I can’t help but remember how much work we had to put in to raise our little dab of corn.

I remember plowing with a team consisting of a retired race horse, a small mule and a hillside plow. With that type of plow you plowed a farrow across the field, turn and flip the plow to the other side and plow back the way we came. With it we could plow a land that was steeper and do a good job. Next came the drag, some heavy boards fastened together, to knock down the chunks. Next came the disk or harrow, a spike tooth job and the field was ready to plant.

We then marked our rows with a sled type outfit, in order to make it look like a corn field, and we were ready to plant. Our planter had a place for fertilizer and a place for seed corn. It planted one hill at a time as we walked across the field jabbing it into the ground each time we took a step. We were ready for our corn crop to grow and hoped the crows didn’t bother it. Sometimes a dead crow or two was hung in the field to keep the crows away. Don’t know if it worked or not. All we had to do was wait till we had to plow and hoe our crop.

Is it any wonder we didn’t get obese? Back then we called it fat. Kids just don’t know what they are missing nowadays.

I’m not a complete idiot, some parts are just missing.

Remember church Sunday, there’s plenty of room.

 

 

Classifieds
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May 6 Classifieds
■  May 6 Garage Sales

OBITUARIES 

ELLIS W. MATTHEY *
Ellis W. Matthey, 74, Union St., Hannibal, died April 28, 2010 at his home. He was born Feb. 17, 1936 in Salem, W.Va., a son of the late Paul Frederick and Chleo Nutter Matthey.

He was a retired cast house operator for Consolidated Aluminum in Hannibal; a member of American Legion Post 760 Hannibal and VFW Post 9930 Duffy; a U.S. Army veteran of the Korean War; and a Baptist by faith.

Surviving are a son, Terry (Beverly Cain) Matthey of Hannibal; a daughter, Sherri (Scott) McCune of Fly; a brother, Melvin (Patty) Matthey of Zanesville; a brothe-rin-law, Bob Robbins of Marietta; two grandchildren, Cassie (Cory) Hammel, Brianne McCune, both of Fly; and a great-granddaughter, Hallie Hammel.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by his wife, Mary Jane Matthey; and a sister, Cleta Robbins.

Friends were received May 2 at Grisell Funeral Home & Crematory, New Martinsville, where funeral services were held May 3, with Rev. Frank Conley officiating. Burial was in Harter Cemetery, Hannibal where Hannibal American Legion Post 760 conducted military graveside service.

Sympathy expressions at grisellfuneralhomes.com.

ELSIE M. HOLLENBECK
Elsie Mae Frye Hollenbeck, 89, Moore Rdg. Rd., Woodsfield, formerly of Duffy, died April 28, 2010 in the Monroe County Care Center, Woodsfield. She was born Oct. 10, 1920 in Duffy, a daughter of the late George Martin and Stella Mae Lively Frye.

She was a member of the Duffy Church of Christ.

Surviving are a daughter, Bonnie (Carl) Novak of Clarington; three granddaughters, Carla (George) Whittier of Rockton, Ill., Candace Leigh Novak of Columbus, Christina Lynn Novak of Twinsburg; three great-grandchildren, Joanie Whittier, Catherine Mary Grace Whittier, George August “Gus” Whittier; and two brothers, Joe (Pauline) Frye of Duffy, George (Betsy) Fry of Hannibal.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her husband, John Robert “Bob” Hollenbeck; five sisters and two brothers.

Friends were received May 2 at Grisell Funeral Home, Clarington, where funeral services were held May 3, with Evangelist Jeff Rich officiating. burial was in Emma Grove Cemetery, Hannibal.

Memorial contributions may be made to Clarington ESquad, P.O. Box 256, Clarington, OH 43915.

Sympathy expressions at grisellfuneralhomes.com.

EDWARD D. LEASURE
Edward Dale Leasure, Sr., 65, 224 North Sixth St., Byesville, died April 30, 2010 at his home. He was born July 7, 1944 near Stafford, a son of the late Bert Otis and Blanche Brown Leasure.

He was a retired construction worker for the Laborers Union Local #639, Marietta. He enjoyed watching his son dirt track racing and was an avid Duke basketball fan.

Surviving are his companion, Patti McConnell Leasure of the home; a son, Edward Dale , Jr. (Tammy) Leasure of Cambridge; a sister, Margaret Dillon of Marietta; two grandchildren, Zachary Leasure, Lacey Leasure; and several nieces and nephews.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister in infancy; five brothers, Junior, Roger, James, Pete and Lloyd Leasure.

Friends were received May 2 at Watters Funeral Home, Woodsfield, where funeral services were held May 3, with Evangelist Mark Beros officiating. Burial followed in Mt. Tabor Cemetery near Summerfield.

Memorial contributions may be made to the Hospice of Guernsey, P.O. Box 1165, Cambridge, OH 43725.

Online condolences may be expressed at www.wattersfuneralhome.com.

ERMA CLAAR
Erma McDougal Claar, 95, Woodsfield, formerly of Clarington, died April 29, 2010 in Woodsfield Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. She was born Aug. 6, 1914 in Beallsville, a daughter of the late Leonard and Carrie Bolen Reed.

She was a retired checker/tagger for Bobbie Brooks Garment Factory; a member of Thoburn United Methodist Church in St. Clairsville; previous member of Bethel and Clarington United Methodist churches.

Surviving are two sons, Neil (Arden) McDougal of Marietta, James (Marsha) McDougal of Bellbrook; five grandchildren, Brett (Linda) McDougal of Marietta, Jay (Sarah) McDougal of Stockport, Frank (Tammy) McDougal of Pendleton, Ky., Cassie (Matt) Pfeiffer of Waynesville, Philip (Becky) McDougal of Spirit Lake, Idaho; and seven great-grandchildren.

In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her first husband, Raymond McDougal; her second husband, Frank Coletti and third husband, Roy Claar; a brother, Glen Reed; and three sisters, Lula Worrel, Alta Truex and Alma Mellott.

Friends were received May 5, from 24 and 79 p.m. at Grisell Funeral Home, Clarington, where services will be held May 6, at 11 a.m., with Rev. Lee Ann Dunlap officiating. Burial in Clarington

Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to Clarington U.M. Church, 106 Church St., Clarington, OH 43915.

Sympathy expressions at grisellfuneralhomes.com.

MADELINE MELLINGER
Madeline R. Mellinger, 85, Jerusalem, died May 2, 2010 at Barnesville Hospital. She was born Feb. 26, 1925, a daughter of the late Milton and Anna Jeffers Stephen.

She was a member of St. John’s Catholic Church, Miltonsburg.

Surviving are three sons, Bruce (Kathy) Sefert of Beallsville, Roger (Joann) Sefert of Graysville, Stephen (Julie) Mellinger of Centerville; six daughters, Sandy (Charles) Flynn of Albany, Marlene (Donnie) Burkhart of Malaga, Arlene (George) Chappell of Boston, Tina Mellinger of Cridersville, Christine Mellinger of Jerusalem, Crystal (Luke) Cunningham of Jerusalem; three brothers, Clyde (Martha) Stephen of Salem, Joseph (Nancy) Stephen of Canton; two sisters, Thelma Froehlich of Barnesville, Virginia Gallagher of Canton; 33 grandchildren; 56 great-grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by her first husband, Arla Sefert; second husband, Arthur Dale Mellinger 12/3/1992; son, Charles Sefert; daughter,  Bonnie Sensibaugh; infant daughter, April Mellinger; four  sisters, Marjorie Carpenter, Bertha Carpenter, Mildred Hardesty, Wanda Devitt; five brothers, Clarence, Garold, Hubert, and Roland Stephen .

Friends were received May 5, from 4  8 p.m. at CampbellPlumlyMilburn Funeral Home, Barnesville, and Mass of Christian Burial will be held May 6, at 11:30 at St. John’s Catholic Church, Miltonsburg, with Fr. David Gaydosik officiating. Burial will be in Crestview Cemetery, Barnesville.