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Nov. 12, 2009

River Museum Lease Signed


Greg Harper, seated, CEO, Ohio Valley Community Credit Union, signs a lease which will allow the OVCCU building in Clarington to be utilized as the Monroe County River Museum. Signing the lease along with Harper was Tom Scott, standing at left, community developer, Team Monroe. Attending the signing were, from left, Scott, Barb Rush, curator; Taylor Abbott, museum committee chair and Fred McCabe, historian.  Photo by Arlean Selvy

by Arlean Selvy
Publisher

It was an exciting day as the efforts of several individuals culminated in the signing of a lease which will allow the  launch of a river museum in Clarington.

“I’m just ecstatic about this opportunity!” said Barb Rush. Her eyes sparkling with excitement, Rush commented about how the people of Monroe County have worked together to return river history to the riverfront. 

“It’s long overdue,” said Taylor Abbott, museum committee president and director of the Monroe County River Museum. “The museum has been on a lot of people’s minds and this is the first step.”

“Our objective is to create a facility that will provide the general public the unique opportunity to experience the impact the Ohio River has provided to the early settlement and continued economic health of Monroe County,” said Tom Scott, community developer, Team Monroe.

Scott noted the generosity and thoughtfulness of Ohio Valley Community Credit Union for helping to make the dream for a museum a reality.

“It was a good opportunity for us to give something back to the riverfront,” said Greg Harper, credit union CEO. He said the credit union has been in business on the riverfront since 1960. “If we can do anything to help, we’re glad to do it,” he said.

The lease agreement between Team Monroe and OVCCU calls for a payment of $1.00 a year. The credit union will pay utilities the first year.

In addition to the lease, it was noted that Team Monroe, referred to as the parent organization, recently acquired insurance on the museum building and future contents. The policy was purchased from Francis J. Paulus Ins. of Woodsfield.

Hannibal resident Fred McCabe is the museum’s historian. A history buff and collector of river memorabilia, the Clarington museum is the sixth museum with which McCabe has been involved.

“I look forward to the positive impact the museum will have,” said McCabe.

In addition to the experience brought to the museum project by McCabe, former county resident Jane Roth Williams is returning to Monroe County and has offered to help. Part of the excitement exhibited by Rush is due to Williams’ return. “She has a degree in museum science,” said Rush, noting Williams has worked in over 100 museums. “I think we’re in good hands,” she said. 

Asked if she thought the return of Williams is a coincidence, Rush flashed a big smile and said, “I think it’s a huge blessing.”

According to Rush, Wil-liams currently resides in Gig Harbor, Washington, and plans to return to Monroe County after the first of the year.

McCabe expressed the need for volunteers and for items the committee may be able to use. He said they’d like representation from all the families of the county. “We’ve got a long way to go, and a short time to get there,” said McCabe.

Monroe County River Museum will display documents, artifacts, carvings and related items.

A room will be set-aside for each Monroe County village situated on the river’s shoreline, with artifacts and histories depicting those specific geographical areas.

A continuous video will relate the impact  the river has provided to the entire county. The displays will portray the events that have contributed to the rich river heritage and traditions that are Monroe County.

Scott said the museum will operate under the umbrella of the Monroe Arts Council until Team Monroe’s application for a 501c3 status is approved.

Individuals or commercial entities wishing to offer documents or artifacts for display purposes, or to donate financial support, are asked and encouraged to contact Barbara Rush at 740-458-1873 or Tom Scott at 740-213-0455.       

 

Development District for his more than 20 years of service.

This honor recognizes a current or past Buckeye Hills-Hocking Valley Regional Development District board member, business, community or county leader who exemplifies principles of vision and leadership and commitment to the success of the eight-county region. The award honors the leadership of C. Boyer Simcox who served as Executive Director of Buckeye Hills and as an advocate for the region.

Curtis has served as a Buckeye Hills leader on the Executive Committee, the Personnel Committee and with the Revolving Loan Fund. 

“John Curtis is a dedicated volunteer leader with Buckeye Hills,” said Executive Director Misty Casto. “Our organization is strengthened by the input of community and business leaders like John. We are pleased that he has committed his time and talents to our district.”

Curtis is also active on the Monroe County Airport Board and as chairman of the Monroe County Democratic Central Committee. He is retired from the Ormet Corp. and has been married to wife, Kay for 46 years. They have three children and six grandchildren. 

 

Our Readers Write

Dear Friends,

God certainly blessed Charlie’s Run with beautiful weather. Temperatures rose to 64 degrees. It was warm for runners, but they got along pretty good. No matter the weather, runners chose to spend 12 hours running to help needy children with hospital bills. Runners were: Charlie Kozlesky, Dick Sanders, Ruta Mazelis, Lori Michener, Chris Benedict, Mitch Toto, Keith Kyer, Bill Potts, Mark Pack, Tom Mays, Mick and Ashley Schumacher and Juston Wickman.

It’s hard for first-time runners to believe the support the run gets, knowing that Charlie has lived elsewhere for over 15 years. Monroe County has many giving people who remember what the event is all about - free or decreased medical help for children in need.

Donnie Weber and the Woodsfield Street Dept. do a great job getting the course in shape, as does Chief Chuck Hamilton and the Woodsfield  P.D., who set up and tore down the course. Continued cooperation from village council helps make it possible.

The following also helped make the run a success: Pyro-Apparel of Cleveland provided jackets for the runners, food was donated by McDonald’s, Jerry Lee’s, Riesbeck’s, Carl Delbrugge and Subway. Traditions Restaurant served a delicious dinner of rigatoni, the night before the run; ladies of Woodsfield Methodist Church prepared a wonderful breakfast and the men and women of VFW Post 5303 prepared an awesome spaghetti dinner. Olive Tree Inn and Dick and Marie Yoss provided overnight accommodations for the runners. Rick Schuerman and Philip Keevert provided a trailer for time keepers: Carol Bonsall, Betty Edington, Peggy Buckalew, Pat Price, Mary Lou Frieden, Debbie Frye and Jean Clift. Much needed showers were provided by Jay Circosta at the Monroe Central fieldhouse.

Peggy Buckalew did a wonderful job organizing the run. I could not have done my job without her help! Peggy’s husband, Tim, and son Austin, were a great help both before and after the run.

May God bless each and everyone of you for your continued support. It’s a privilege to work with such wonderful and giving people.

In Christian Love,
Pandora Neuhart

Around the Burnside

Have you adjusted to slow time yet? I woke up at 6:30 a.m. since the time change. It’s nice to roll over and go back to sleep for an hour or two, three and maybe four. The weather gal said we will get an extra hour of sleep and lose an hour of daylight. I couldn’t figure this out. We only lose a few minutes of daylight every day and next month we gain a few minutes a day. One year I worked on fast time and lived on slow time. That was a lot of fun.

Just a little bit of personal history this week although a good many of you already know it. I lived in Fairview from the third grade until I married. We were poor but did not know it. In fact, if we had a quarter we thought we were stepping in the tall clover. We made do with what we had. We raised most of our food and we had our own pork, beef, chicken but no salt fish. I ate bread and butter when salt fish showed up on the table. We also had plenty of soup beans.

One of the things about Fairview, it was a friendly town. In fact, because there was no air conditioning, if you wanted the latest news all you had to do was walk down street. There was someone sitting on almost every house porch ready to fill you in. Some had party line phones. Even as a kid we had to stop and talk. Mant of these visits consisted of stories of what they did when they were kids. I don’t remember anyone we thought was a grouch, a bit grumpy at times maybe. Ok, we called our bus driver Grumpy.

Bond’s Store was the favorite place for loafers. On the benches in front of the store during the summer and around the burnside stove during the winter. This was where the stories filled the air along with smoke and tobacco juice. I used to listen to these stories even if some were a bit on the tall side. In fact, I think my present personality was developed as a result of knowing and being around these good old boys.

With a background like this, is it any wonder I think of myself as a storyteller? When I attended OSU, before all the new technology, they suggested a story or interesting explanation would help students remember what you were teaching. More story telling.

I really got into story telling in 1955 as a 4-H agent. At that time we had Indian campfires four evenings. The campfire was lighted with how Indians got fire. After the four tribes presented their activities, as the big chief I usually told an Indian story or two. Having a camper come back and tell me they wished their kids could hear some of the stories they heard around the campfire makes it all worth it. We even had Indian programs at FFA camp.

I still like to listen to stories. Age and travel has cut down on trips to state and national storytelling events. I had a chance to hear a local storyteller the other Sunday. I enjoy his stories and have his book and CDs. After the session, I mentioned to a lady, “I don’t know how he does it.” Her answer, “It’s a God given ability, just like you and writing.” You know she was right. Too often we don’t give Him credit. We want to take all the credit for things we accomplish.

I’ve been told my “Around the Burnside” efforts are getting too long. Maybe that’s correct as sometimes when I see a long letter to the editor I don’t read it all. I don’t want that to happen to my humble efforts. I know there have been times it has been boring. I guess the length is due to my thinking of a storyteller. Each week I try to write of something interest for many readers and maybe bring back memories to some and maybe doubts to other. Yes, I do throw in some of my personal thinking on some items such as the new building for students, our FFA chapter and other items I think  might be interesting. For example: I learned one thing wrong in our country, in my opinion, with our Halloween candy. We purchased among other candy some Reese peanutbutter cups. I really like them and kind of hated to pass them to trick or treaters. We had a few left over so I had one. To my surprise I found, under the flaps along the back of the wrapper, “Mfg. in Mexico for Hershey Candy Co.” Tried to hide it. I’ve eaten my last Reese peanutbutter cup, maybe their other candy.

I guess my storytelling blood comes to life as I write because most of the time I think of something I think will be interesting to readers and it takes off resulting in a possible overload.

Then I get to thinking; I started writing Around the Burnside on Jan. 29, 1985. If my math is correct this amounts to 1290 counting the one you are reading, I can only remember missing a couple of weeks and one deadline. I guess maybe I should think about putting Around the Burnside to bed and not worry what to write and what length. Twenty-five years is a long time. Don’t forget church Sunday.

Whatever you want to to, do it - there are only so many tomorrows.

 

 

Fire Destroys Stevens’ Home

Firefighters put out hot spots at the site of a fire at the Victor Stevens mobile home, Mt. Victory Road, Steinersville.

A four-alarm fire on Nov. 8 destroyed the home of a Steinersville man who was acquitted of rape on Nov. 5 by a Belmont County jury.

Victor Stevens, 44, Mt. Victory Road, was in jail for a probation violation at the time of the fire. Stevens is a registered sex offender. He was on parole from a 2007 case when he was charged with rape and aggravated burglary.

Stevens testified under oath that he was out beyond his court-mandated curfew on the night of the incident.

Sunday’s fire destroyed Stevens’ mobile home and its contents.

According to Powhatan Fire Chief Tom Nelms, the State Fire Marshall was to be at the scene on Monday, Nov. 9.

Firefighters were alerted about 1 p.m. by Kayla Gump, whose home is located two doors from the Stevens’ residence. Her husband, David, said he'd finished mowing his lawn, went inside and took a shower and when he came back outdoors he noticed smoke coming from the Stevens’ home.

"I went to see if anyone was inside," said David, "But when I touched the door it was so hot it burned my hand." He said he then ran to the home of Chet Jennewein on the opposite side of the Stevens' residence. Jennewein had also been mowing and had gone inside. 

Jennewein and a firefighter were able to drag two propane tanks away from the burning structure. 

In addition to Powhatan, responding fire departments included Clarington, Shadyside and Moundsville. Emergency vehicles and a rescue truck were also on the scene.

Costs Climb for MCCC Project

The price tag on Monroe County Care Center’s assisted living facility is climbing. Recommendation has been made that construction begin as soon as possible.

Information that the originally projected cost has increased nearly 25 percent was brought to Monroe County Commissioners during their Nov. 2 meeting.

Bob Reed and Ron White of Share, the Columbus firm which administers the care center, reported the total project cost is now at $2,292,000, “just under 25 percent higher than the original too optimistic estimates of $1,750,000, before financing costs and interest during construction.”

According to Reed and White, the higher cost will mean the care center will have to contribute $247,000 to the project from the enterprise fund. The center already has paid about $106,000 in architect, engineering, geotechnical and survey fees, leaving an additional $141,000 to be paid  by the care center.

It was also  noted that the contract bids are based upon expected conditions at the site, but there are still some uncertainties existing as to the cost of earthwork to prepare the site for actual construction.

According to the administrators, DIS Architects told them they should allow for a 10 percent contingency cost on the cost of the assisted living project, “which would increase the possible project cost by $170,000 to a possible $317,000.”

Therefore, it was recommended by Reed and White that the 15-unit assisted living See the Nov. 12 Beacon for more

Buckeye Hills-Hocking Valley Regional Development District 2008 Executive Committee at the semi-annual meeting include, front from left: President Bob Daubenmier, Hocking County; Vice- President Ron Moore, Morgan County; Treasurer Sam Cook, Washington County. Second row: Fred Shriner, Perry County; Charlie Cowgill, Noble County; Gary Starner, Hocking County; John Curtis, Monroe County; and Sonny Block, Monroe County. Third row: Jim Sheet, Meigs County and Dean Cain  of Morgan County.

 

Kay and John Curtis are shown with Executive Director Misty Casto as John receives The Simcox Leadership Award at the semi-annual meeting of Buckeye Hills-Hocking Valley Regional Development District for his more than 20 years of service with the organization

 

Curtis Honored for Service 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sardis resident John Curtis was honored with the The Simcox Leadership Award at the semi-annual meeting of Buckeye Hills-Hocking Valley Regional Development District for his more than 20 years of service.

This honor recognizes a current or past Buckeye Hills-Hocking Valley Regional Development District board member, business, community or county leader who exemplifies principles of vision and leadership and commitment to the success of the eight-county region. The award honors the leadership of C. Boyer Simcox who served as Executive Director of Buckeye Hills and as an advocate for the region.

Curtis has served as a Buckeye Hills leader on the Executive Committee, the Personnel Committee and with the Revolving Loan Fund. 

“John Curtis is a dedicated volunteer leader with Buckeye Hills,” said Executive Director Misty Casto. “Our organization is strengthened by the input of community and business leaders like John. We are pleased that he has committed his time and talents to our district.”

Curtis is also active on the Monroe County Airport Board and as chairman of the Monroe County Democratic Central Committee. He is retired from the Ormet Corp. and has been married to wife, Kay for 46 years. They have three children and six grandchildren. 

 

OBITUARIES

WILBUR “CUB” JONES 
Wilbur “Cub” Jones, 84, Jones Lane, Sardis, died Nov. 4, 2009 in New Martinsville. He was born April 23, 1925 in Sardis, a son of the late Fred and Eva (Kate) Hayes Jones.

He was a retired machinist for General Motors Corporation; and a Jackson Township Trustee with many years of service.

Cub was a member of the American Legion Post 760, Hannibal; VFW Post 9930, Duffy; Military Order of the Purple Heart; DAV; Combat Infantrymen’s Association; a U.S. Army combat veteran of WWII, having fought for his country in the South Pacific Theater, and the recipient of both the Oak Leaf Cluster Purple Heart and Bronze Star; and a Protestant by faith.

Surviving are his wife of 50 years, Donna Jones; a son, Eric Jones of Sardis; three daughters, Sandra (Alex) Kon of Hudson, Sheri Jones and Erin (Scott) Boggs, both of Sardis; two brothers, Dale (Norma) Jones of Ravenna, Donald (Lila) Jones of Clarington; three sisters, Alberta (Lester) Lohri, Betty Howell, Delores (Larry) Romick, all of Sardis; and three grandchildren, Cody Jones, Shannon Jones and Alex Kon.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a son, Denver Jones; three brothers, Harris, Harold and Darrell Jones; and a sister, Dorothy Frieden.

Friends were received Nov. 7 at Grisell Funeral Home, Sardis, where funeral services were held Nov. 8, with Minister Keith Jones officiating.

Burial was in Mount Olive Cemetery, Sardis, where American Legion Post 760  conducted military graveside services.

Sympathy expressions at grisellfuneralhomes.com.

ROBERT L. SELMON
Robert L. Selmon, 69, New Matamoras, died Nov. 2, 2009 at Camden Clark Memorial Hospital, after a short battle with pancreatic cancer. He was born Jan. 2, 1940 in New Matamoras, a son of Helen Barker Selmon of Woodsfield, and the late Jess Selmon. 

He was a member of the Church of Christ, was retired from Ormet Corporation after 30 plus years service, retiring in 1996. He was an auctioneer and a realtor. He was a member of the National Auctioneer Association and the National Association of Realtors; American Union Lodge #1 F.& A.M. of Marietta, a 32 degree mason, Valley of Cambridge, and a member of the Washington County Scottish Rite Club. He loved to read and enjoyed beagle dogs.

Surviving, in addition to his mother, are his wife of 50 years, Sherry Laird Selmon; a daughter, Roberta Ann “Bobbi” (Steven) Sayre of Dexter City; grandson, David A. II (Kelley) Fitzgerald of Cincinnati; a great-granddaughter, Paige Elizabeth Fitzgerald; sisters and brothers, Ruby,  his twin, (Duane) Ring,  and Grace King, all of Graysville; George (Judy) Selmon of Chester, W.Va., Wilma Selmon and Walter Selmon, both of East Liverpool; his very special beagle, “Suzi”, and several nieces and nephews.

In addition to his father, he was preceded in death by his maternal grandparents, George and Grace Barker, who helped raise him.

Friends were received Nov. 6 at Ingram Funeral Home, St. Marys, W.Va., where a celebration of Bob’s life was held  with Brent Gallaher officiating. It was Bob’s wishes to be cremated.  Inurnment will be at a later date at the convenience of the family. 

Memorial contributions may be made to the donor’s choice.

Sympathy expressions may be made to www.ingramfh.com.

SR. JOANNA BURKHART S.F.P.
Sr. Joanna Burkhart, S.F.P., 88, Cincinnati, and a Franciscan Sister of the Poor for 65 years, who devoted her life to caring for the sick and needy in various ministries, responded to God’s call to eternal life on Oct. 30, 2009.

She served in the Social Service Centers of St. John’s, Cincinnati, St. Michael’s in Steubenville, and St. Raphael’s in Hamilton. From 1951 to 1960 Sister Joanna was assigned to dietary duties in Covington, Ky, Kansas City, Kan., and Cincinnati before going to Frascati, Rome, Italy from 1960-68. She was delighted to invite American guests to the Thanksgiving dinner she prepared each year with such care for tradition. For three years she taught at St. Henry Catechetical Center in St. Henry, Ohio. Sister Joanna was a certified Catholic chaplain by the National Association of Catholic Chaplains since 1975 and served as chaplain counselor in Pastoral services from 1973-2000 at Providence Hospital, Cincinnati, and Franciscan Hospital Western Hills, Cincinnati. It gave her much joy to visit, pray with and support the patients and their families during the time of illness and death.

Surviving are two siblings, Stella (Paul) Crum of Woods-field, and Cyril (Rosemary) Burkhart of Lewisville; many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and nephews, great-great-nieces and nephews, many friends and Franciscan Sisters of the Poor who will miss her warm-hearted, compassionate care, concern, determined spirit, charming smile and infectious laugh.

Friends were received Nov. 2 at St. Clare Convent Chapel, Cincinnati, where Mass of Christian Burial was held Nov. 3. Burial followed in the convent cemetery.

Local information provided Watters Funeral Home, Woodsfield.

BERTHA JANE TALBOT
Bertha Jane Talbot, 88, Clarington, died Nov. 2, 2009 at home. She was born July 16, 1921 in Clarington, a daughter of the late Earnest and Ada Speece Saffle.

She was a homemaker; a former employee of Dotta’s IGA in Clarington; retired from Monroe County Care Center; and was a member of the Clarington Church of Christ.

Surviving are her husband of 71 years, Ivan J. Talbot; two sons, Ian (Arletta) Talbot of Powhatan Point, Ronnie (Candy) Talbot of Cameron; a daughter, Wilma (Paul) Nelms of Clarington; eight grandchildren, John Talbot of MI, Lori Luther of Fla., Shannon (Mike) Smith of Sardis, Colleen (Ron) Warrington of Clarington, Aaron (Feonia) Talbot of Ely, England, Terry Talbot of Beallsville, Kiley (David) Hammond of Fayetteville, N.C., Heather (Jeff) Cox of Woodsfield; nine great-grandchildren; and a great-great-grandson.

In addition to her parents, she was preceded in death by a son, Donnie Talbot, who passed away on April 17, 1975; two sisters, Ilene Kocher, Eva Gilmore; and three brothers, Howard, James and Harry Saffle.

Friends were received Nov. 4 and 5 until time of funeral service at Grisell Funeral Home, Clarington, with David Lively officiating. Burial in Clarington Cemetery, Clarington.

Sympathy expressions at grisellfuneralhomes.com.

OSCAR E. SMITH 
Oscar E. Smith, 71, Woodsfield, died Nov. 1, 2009 at Barnesville Hospital. He was born Sept. 13, 1938 in St. Clairsville, a son of the late Russell Eugene and Iva (Clary) Smith.

He served his country in the Marine Corps and Army. He was a member of Woodsfield VFW Post 5303 Men’s Auxiliary.

Surviving are a daughter, Tina M. Smith of Harmony, W.Va.; two sisters, Kathy (Ron) Riley of Columbia, S.C., Wanda (John) Hoff of Woodsfield; three brothers, Carl Harper Jr. of Woodsfield, Ted D. Smith of Lafferty, Orville A. Smith of Martins Ferry; three grandchildren and a very special friend, Grethel Frank of Woodsfield.

In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by a sister, Iva Mae Hinkle; brother, Rusty Smith; step-mother, Eloise Smith and step-father, Carl Harper, Sr.

Friends were received Nov. 8 at Campbell-Plumly-Milburn Funeral Home, Barnesville, until time of the military service conducted by Belmont County Council of the VFW.

Burial was in Crestview Cemetery, Barnesville. Send condolences to www.campbellplumlymilburnfuneralhome.com.

KATRINA J. DAUGHERTY
Katrina Janeen Daugherty, 53, Daugherty Rd., Clarington, died Nov. 5, 2009 at Wetzel County Hospital, New Martinsville. She was born Dec. 1, 1955 in Wetzel County, W.Va.

She was a homemaker and a Protestant by faith. Surviving are her husband, Sherrell Daugherty; two sons, Brian (Jacque) Daugherty of Jerusalem, Myles (Heather) Daugherty of Laings; two daughters, Yolanda (fiance James Crumm) Daugherty, Cheryl Daugherty; three brothers, Melvin Grayam, Creed Grayam, Jr. and Kyle Grayam; a sister, Martha Ann Grayam; her father, Creed Grayam, all of Clarington; six grandchildren; and two great-great-grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her mother, Corrine Wisor Grayam.

Friends were received Nov. 7 and 8 at Grisell Funeral Home, Clarington, where funeral services were held Nov. 9, with Rev. Rikke Brown officiating. Burial was in Clarington Cemetery.
Sympathy expressions at www.grisellfuneralhomes.com.

JOHN T. MAGYAR
John T. Magyar, 68, Sardis, died Nov. 5, 2009. There was no visitation. A private memorial service will be held at the convenience of the family. Arrangements by Bauer-Turner Funeral Home, Woodsfield.

ZELLA B. CALDWELL
Zella Beryl Caldwell, 79, Beallsville, died Nov. 6, 2009.

Friends were received Nov. 9 at Harper Funeral Home, Beallsville, where funeral services were held Nov. 10. Condolences may be expressed  at www.harperfh.net.